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What’s the Impact of Hydration on Your Mental Health?

Water plays a key role in carrying nutrients and oxygen to the cells. It also aids in digestion and flushes bacteria from your bladder. Understanding the water mental health connection will help you consume the optimal amount of water.

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Does Water Help with Mental Health?

Some people go days without drinking straight water, but they still get little amounts through food and other sources such as coffee and fruits. Every cell in the body needs water, so consuming less than the optimal amount of water could drastically impact your health because of dehydration. Also, overconsumption of water could lead to the depletion of salts, placing your health at risk.

What’s Dehydration?

Dehydration occurs due to losing more fluid than you take in. It means the body lacks enough water to carry out normal functions. If you don’t replace lost fluids, you’ll suffer dehydration, which manifests in less frequent urination, confusion, dizziness, extreme thirst, dark-coloured urine, and fatigue. A level of hydration below optimal could affect your mood as you lose water mental health benefits. The brain and the heart contain more water than any other part of your body, so it’s crucial to ensure you get sufficient water.

How Dehydration Affects Your Brain

One way dehydration affects your body is that it slows circulation, altering how you feel and think. The water intake and mental health relationship shows that a low intake of water lowers blood flow, which could mean less oxygen gets transported to vital organs, including the brain. Studies show that taking enough water help with mental health. Being dehydrated increases the risk of depression, anxiety, and other unhealthy mental states. 

How Much Water Is Enough?

Now that you understand you need enough water for mental health benefits, how much is enough? The amount of water you need to maintain a water mental health balance depends on many things, including your diet, where you live, the season or temperature, your health, and how active you are. On average, you need 2.7 litres of water a day if you’re a woman, or 3.7 litres if you’re a man.

Overhydration

While taking a glass of water for mental health benefits is ideal, you could also pose a threat to your health by consuming too much water. Taking too much water could deplete salts and other vital nutrients. So you’re advised to take nitric oxide supplements in addition to ensuring you drink the right amount of water. Brain cells are particularly at risk of overhydration and could suffer low sodium levels. You may experience symptoms like lethargy and distractibility, and if the overhydration happens quickly, you may have trouble with balance or experience vomiting. To solve this problem, you need to restrict fluid intake. 

If the overhydration is caused by excess blood volume because of heart, kidney, or liver disease, managing the consumption of sodium would also be helpful. Before you make any of these decisions, seek guidance from a licensed doctor.

Understanding The Water Mental Health Connection

Your body needs the right amount of hydration to maintain a healthy balance and support vital processes. One of the organs affected by dehydration is your brain. So ensure you drink enough water to stay alert. Also, be careful about overhydration, which could also trigger mental health problems.  

Thomas Nemel is an author and online researcher who specializes in sharing tips to help people improve their health and lifestyle. He publishes about proper dieting and health conditions you can avoid by embracing a healthy routine.

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